Two Racisms

March 28, 2018 Morality, Sociocultural Issues No Comments

At the surface, racism is simply about a feeling of superiority over people from another race or ethnicity. Here ends the easy part.

Why do people rank other people as inferior or superior based on inherited characteristics? With due respect to those being racially discriminated, I want to make the distinction between explicit and implicit racism. According to me, this distinction is important in order to know how to handle racism, globally.

A distinction seldom made

Mainly the implicit kind is not generally acknowledged. This is because our culture (world-wide) doesn’t take nonconscious ‘implicit’ processing into account very generally, in theory nor in practice. Thus, at present, for a person who thinks himself to be non-racist, all ‘racists’ are equally… guilty, only depending on the degree of ‘racism’. How to handle a racist is also always the same: through persuasion and/or suppression. This simplifies things. One way or the other, action can be taken swiftly. But without relevant distinction, this action may be counter-productive. Thus, after all, the distinction is useful, even necessary.

Explicit racism is an easy way to make oneself ‘superior’.

It’s an easy way to diminish another group’s societal rights or status and by doing so, to be better off oneself. This may be financially, relationally, or personally: feeling better because someone else is supposed to be less worthy. Explicit racism is plain opportunism. It should be treated as such. It is a conscious choice and ethically wrong. The treatment should also be at the conscious level: persuasion through argumentation and legal punishment are options.

Implicit racism is different.

The implicit racist does not consciously decide to be so. His racist feeling is akin to a psychological addiction for instance, or a phobia. There might be a genetic factor involved. An implicit racist can feel an anxiety or some other unwanted feeling without conscious control over it. This may be a full-blown racist feeling, or it may be an un-wellness, a not feeling at ease or an ambivalence in particular circumstances. This is unwelcome, but not something to be ashamed of. An implicit racist is in no case morally inferior. Sometimes people privately feel this as a kind of hidden racism and are ashamed, but they need not be. They should however take the responsibility to look for good coaching at the non-conscious level.

Shallow and deep racism are different conditions and need very different treatments.

Both can of course be present in the same person. Even so, that person is in need not of one kind of ‘treatment’ but of both.

Conclusion: if you feel a ‘racist’ inclination and you cannot help it, you shouldn’t feel guilty. If it does bother you or others, then you should get help.

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