Hooray it Works!

April 26, 2018 General, Sociocultural Issues No Comments

It seems like the basis of this culture. Not so much the phrase in itself but rather the direct stop at its end. It is a culture of minimal effort. If ‘it works’ … what more do you want?

It is also a culture of ‘many’. Many things. Something works and off you go to the next. Why should you keep bumbling around if you can move ‘forward’? There is so much to do. Busy busy sito presto performance. No time to waste. Doing is money and time doesn’t grow on trees, does it? And we very much like it to work. … HOWEVER: is it always enough that something just works? Should one sometimes not rather ask what exactly works? For what purpose? Why? For whom? … Bah. Each question seems a question too many! Each question brings us further away from our goal.

But what goal would that eventually be? …

Well then. Some questions need to be asked.

One has a medical problem and one is looking for a solution. One cannot find it here and starts looking for it there … and there and there and … Medical shopping.

Now: what is your problem? After a mathematics exam every schoolchild knows that it is essential to understand what is being asked (and those who succeed already understand it before). What is the problem? Once I had an interesting math teacher, who presumed:

“understanding the problem is more than half of the solution.”

Indeed. This is just as well the case with health problems. When you see what your actual problem is, you can also see better what your ultimate goal is. And then you can pursue your goal efficiently. Only then you can pass your exam ‘own health’. On the other hand: just somewhat whirling around until ‘it works’ will almost certainly give you an outcome on a wrong question.

There is a lid for every pot. Okay. But is there also a form of therapy for every pot (and then I am thinking about the many, many forms of alternative therapy )?

Can a therapy be a lid? Maybe it can if it is about ‘covering up’.

Beware! What is being covered up, is what leads to a psychosomatic symptom. This leads to an attitude of “try this and that until you (accidentally) find something what might apply to you.” Hm …

Then I think: we are all prone to ‘placebo’, because we all have a ‘deeper self which is sensitive to ‘communication’. However, there are quite a few differences regarding what this sensitivity translates itself into. In other words: the placebo from one is not that of the other. If you look at this in a trans-cultural way, it is of course super-evident. Also within a culture there are many differences between individual humans. That has to do with education, role- models, identification, knowledge, stories, personal experiences, conditioning, random events etc. Of course sensitivities are always different then.

Thus: there is a placebo for every pot? May be correct.

A placebo (in itself, apart from the person who provides it) IS a lid, if it is covering up the intention. It is a lid if you are looking for ‘the therapy that best suits you’ without thinking twice about it.

Yet I would like to recommend to give this thinking a chance.

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